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Trigger Finger

more about Trigger Finger


  • Trigger finger is a common condition, characterized by a "snapping" of the finger.  This is a tenosynovitis (local inflammation of the tendons and surrounding connective tissues) of the tendons that pull the finger inward toward the palm (flexion).  The affected finger is locked in a bent position.

  • Trigger finger usually occurs in middle-aged individuals or young children.  The first symptom is tenderness at the base of the finger.  There may be a palpable knot resulting from the scarring of the tendon and sheath.  The locking can be released by a strong effort or by extending the finger with the other hand.  If the condition worsens, the finger will not extend at all.

  • The cause of tenosynovitis is uncertain.  Other underlying diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, gout, and diabetes can be associated with trigger finger
  • Finger locking -- the local inflammation of the tendon and sheath (the tunnel like structures surrounding tendon) causes scarring and constriction.  This condition interrupts the free gliding of the tendons within the sheath.

  • Stretching of the affected finger, ice and anti-inflammatory drugs may be helpful during the initial period.
  • Injection of steroids -- most patients are cured by a local injection of steroids around the tendon sheath, which relieves the inflammation and swelling
  • Surgery-if the steroid injection does not work, a surgical release may be indicated.  The procedure is done under a local anesthesia, and takes only a few minutes.  The prognosis is favorable.




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