eCureMe logo
  eCureMe home eCureMe log In Sign Up!
eCureMe Life : Your Healthy Living. Click Here!
Welcome, eCureMe.com medical contents search April 25, 2013
       eCureMe Life
       Medical Supplies
       Calorie Count
       Self-Diagnosis
       Physician Search
       Message Board
      E-mail Doctor
      E-mail Veterinarian
      Self-Diagnosis
      Health-O-Matic Meter
      Calorie Count
      Natural Medicine
      Vitamins & Minerals
      Alternative Living
      My Health Chart
      Diseases & Treatments
      Atlas of Diseases
      Sexually Transmitted
      Diseases
      Drug Information
      Illegal Drugs
      Lab & Diagnostic Tests
      Internal Medicine
      Women’s Health
      Pediatrics
      Eye Disorders
      Skin Disorders
      Headache
      Mental Health
      Radiology
      Neurology
      Allergy
      Resource Links
      Physician Directory
      Dentist Directory
      Hospital Directory





Bell's Palsy

more about Bell's Palsy


  • This is a type of facial paralysis, occurring suddenly on one side of the face.  It is thought to be caused by an inflammation of the facial nerve (cranial nerve VII).  60% of afflicted patients get better without treatment, while 90% of those receiving treatment show improvement.  Since a Stroke may have a similar appearance, it is important to make sure that Bell's palsy is truly the cause.  Rare tumors can also cause similar symptoms, and these need to be excluded as well.

  • Ear pain may precede the attack
  • Face feels stiff
  • Difficulty closing the eyelids
  • Difficulty eating and smiling
  • Loss of taste on one side of the tongue
  • Hypersensitivity to noises
  • Bell's palsy often follows an upper respiratory infection.
  • Excessive eye tearing or lack of tearing on one side.

  • Unknown
  • Exposure to a virus or cold may be the cause in some cases.
  • Facial nerve injury due to head trauma, tumors, Herpes Zoster, or Herpes Simplex vesicles in the outer ear canal (Ramsay-Hunt syndrome) can also lead to paralysis of facial nerve.
  • Bilateral facial paralysis occurs very rarely, and is often due to neurological disease such as Guillain-Barre syndrome.

  • Examination
    1. Paralysis of one side of the face
    2. One of the sides of the face appears drooped
  • Imaging

- CT scan or MRI may be done to rule out Stroke.


  • No treatment is an option, especially if the paralysis is mild.
  • Eye patch is helpful if the eye cannot close completely.
  • Corticosteroids, e.g., Prednisone
  • Corticosteroids work best if they are started sooner than later.
  • Lubricating eye drops, if the eyelid remains open.
  • Recent studies show that Acyclovir (an anti-viral medication) may be helpful.





more about Bell's Palsy


If you want your friend to read or know about this article, Click here






medical contents search

Home   |   About Us   |   Contact Us   |   Employment Ad   |   Help

Terms and Conditions under which this service is provided to you. Read our Privacy Policy.
Copyright © 2002 - 2003 eCureMe, Inc All right reserved.