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Welcome, eCureMe.com medical contents search January 29, 2016
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Excessive Juice Intake

more about Excessive Juice Intake


  • An intake of daily Calories far larger than the number needed for maintenance and growth, from the carbohydrate in fruit juice.

  • Tooth decay (dental caries) in the deciduous teeth and/or the permanent teeth
  • In infants, toddlers, and preschool children this is especially noticeable in the incisors, which grip the nipple of the baby bottle.

  • Overfeeding
  • Milk-sensitive infants in whom it is difficult to find another Calorie source that the infant or child will accept

  • Compatible history of large intake of fruit juice, coupled with visible dental caries or pediatric dental extractions, suggest the diagnosis.

  • Use of fruit juice (which is sweet tasting) to calm a demanding child is one risk factor.

  • Limited intake of fruit juice, or dilution of fruit juice, with water

  • Dental caries
  • Obesity

  • Increased intake of simple sugars (table sugar, powdered sugar, lactose, fructose, sucrose) from any source would create the same problem.  Table sugar is sucrose.  Milk sugar is lactose.  The natural sugars in fruit are usually fructose and glucose.




more about Excessive Juice Intake


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