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Welcome, eCureMe.com medical contents search April 25, 2013
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Allergic Dermatitis

more about Allergic Dermatitis


  • A condition characterized by dry itchy skin
  • Likely a genetic relationship
  • Multiple environmental factors (i.e., food, clothing, soap, bacterial, dust-mites, climate)
  • Emotional stress also worsens
  • More common in infants; 50% are clear by age 10
  • 50% retain the condition to adulthood
  • Associated with Asthma in 50%

  • Dry, scaly rash. Common areas in infants are scalp, cheeks, and elbows.
  • In children and adults, common areas are eyelids, neck, elbow creases, and back of knees
  • Rarely, total body involvement may occur
  • Prolonged episodes may lead to thickening, facial wrinkles, increased pigmentation.

  • Changing of formula (lactose to soy) may benefit some children
  • Avoidance of environmental irritants and triggers
  • Mild soaps, moisturizers, topical and oral antihistamines
  • Restrict bathing to twice weekly; oatmeal baths may help, followed by moisturizers
  • Scalp may benefit from antifungal shampoos and creams
  • Severe cases may benefit from patch testing by a dermatologist
  • Severe cases may require oral steroids and ultra-violet light therapy
  • High-strength steroids may thin skin, cause acne, affect growth, and will require monitoring by a physician.

  • Scratching can cause scarring, infection, increased pigmentation, and thickening of the skin.

  • Avoidance of irritants and triggers




more about Allergic Dermatitis


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