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Welcome, eCureMe.com medical contents search April 30, 2013
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Corneal Abrasion

more about Corneal Abrasion


  • A minor break in the epithelium of the cornea of the eye, due to injury
  • The examiner can see the abrasion if the cornea is stained temporarily by instilling sterile fluorescein topically on the affected cornea.
  • A deep corneal abrasion goes deeper than Bowman's membrane, the layer of tissue just beneath the surface.

  • Significant pain in the affected eye, especially on blinking.

  • Minor injury
  • Occurs when a foreign object is scraped across the cornea

  • Exam procedure:
    1. Contact lenses are removed
    2. The lids are everted (turned outward) to look for residual foreign body.
    3. Sterile fluorescein is topically applied to temporarily stain the abrasion.

  • Exposure to foreign objects, such as dust and dirt
  • Contact lenses

  • At times, cycloplegic drops (paralyzes the ciliary muscle that controls the iris size)
  • Antibiotic ophthalmic ointment or antibiotic ophthalmic drops
  • Eye patch is controversial.
  • Relief of pain with medication
  • Re-examination of the patient at intervals.
  • Difficult cases, or larger deeper abrasions, or cases with prolonged vision impairment might wisely be referred to an opthalmologist.
  • In selected cases, other medication such as steroids might be used.

  • Infection
  • Non-healing
  • There is a risk of bacterial or fungal infection following corneal abrasion

  • Consult a physician.




more about Corneal Abrasion


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