eCureMe logo
  eCureMe home eCureMe log In Sign Up!
eCureMe Life : Your Healthy Living. Click Here!
Welcome, eCureMe.com medical contents search April 25, 2013
       eCureMe Life
       Medical Supplies
       Calorie Count
       Self-Diagnosis
       Physician Search
       Message Board
      E-mail Doctor
      E-mail Veterinarian
      Self-Diagnosis
      Health-O-Matic Meter
      Calorie Count
      Natural Medicine
      Vitamins & Minerals
      Alternative Living
      My Health Chart
      Diseases & Treatments
      Atlas of Diseases
      Sexually Transmitted
      Diseases
      Drug Information
      Illegal Drugs
      Lab & Diagnostic Tests
      Internal Medicine
      Women’s Health
      Pediatrics
      Eye Disorders
      Skin Disorders
      Headache
      Mental Health
      Radiology
      Neurology
      Allergy
      Resource Links
      Physician Directory
      Dentist Directory
      Hospital Directory





Little Leaguer's Elbow

more about Little Leaguer's Elbow


  • Little leaguer's elbow is a term that has been used for injuries of the elbow in young athletes due to the overuse of undeveloped muscles. This includes osteochondritis dissecans, loose body (cartilage fragments floating within the joint) and avulsion fracture. The lesions occur as a result of a chronic strain to immature bones and cartilage (growth plates) in the elbows of young children. As the name suggests, young pitchers are commonly affected. Similar lesions may occur in the shoulders of young athletes, called "little leaguer's shoulder," which causes the pain in the shoulder.


  • The onset of symptoms may be acute or gradual
    1. Elbow pain and swelling
    2. Restricted motion of the elbow
    3. A "catching" sensation is felt in the joint of the elbow.


  • Treatment depends on the type of lesion
      1. Rest the affected arm until the pain subsides.
      2. Physical therapy
      3. Loose body -- Arthroscopic surgery
      4. Fracture -- splint or surgery
      5. To prevent an injury of the elbow, it is generally recommended to limit pitching to 6 innings per week with 3 to 4 days of rest between baseball games. It is also dangerous to teach young children to throw trick pitches such as curveballs, screwballs or fork balls. While they may produce immediate results, the long-term effects on the arm are never worth it.





    more about Little Leaguer's Elbow


    If you want your friend to read or know about this article, Click here






    medical contents search

    Home   |   About Us   |   Contact Us   |   Employment Ad   |   Help

    Terms and Conditions under which this service is provided to you. Read our Privacy Policy.
    Copyright © 2002 - 2003 eCureMe, Inc All right reserved.